The 5 O’Clock Squat

When I was coaching with my friend and colleague Joe Bogle last weekend, I happened to notice that he had a fantastic squat. Squatting is a basic human movement pattern (if you don’t believe me, watch a toddler pick something up) but it seems to get lost when we become adults and sit for hours on end – either at a desk, on a couch, or even driving.

Many times, I see people who try to stay above parallel (which was a tip based on a research project in the 80’s whose findings were eventually proven incorrect) and it causes them to either allow their knees to come excessively forward which can be bad on the knees (remember, “Squats don’t hurt your knees. The way you squat hurts your knees.”) or cause them to hinge back into almost a deadlift pattern and not a squat and with the front loading of a kettlebell goblet or kettlebell front squat can cause unnecessary.

As Joe beautifully demonstrates in the video that goes along with this post, you will see that as he descends into the squat it’s like he is standing by a clock and aiming his butt toward 5PM. This is a clue that even the person with zero fitness background can visualize. You can use this cue to help people be aware of a target for which to aim in the descent of their squat.

colleague Joe Bogle last weekend, I happened to notice that he had a fantastic squat. Squatting is a basic human movement pattern (if you don’t believe me, watch a toddler pick something up) but it seems to get lost when we become adults and sit for hours on end – either at a desk, on a couch, or even driving.

Many times, I see people who try to stay above parallel (which was a tip based on a research project in the 80’s whose findings were eventually proven incorrect) and it causes them to either allow their knees to come excessively forward which can be bad on the knees (remember, “Squats don’t hurt your knees. The way you squat hurts your knees.”) or cause them

When I was coaching with my friend and colleague Joe Bogle last weekend, I happened to notice that he had a fantastic squat. Squatting is a basic human movement pattern (if you don’t believe me, watch a toddler pick something up) but it seems to get lost when we become adults and sit for hours on end – either at a desk, on a couch, or even driving.

Many times, I see people who try to stay above parallel (which was a tip based on a research project in the 80’s whose findings were eventually proven incorrect) and it causes them to either allow their knees to come excessively forward which can be bad on the knees (remember, “Squats don’t hurt your knees. The way you squat hurts your knees.”) or cause them to hinge back into almost a deadlift pattern and not a squat and with the front loading of a kettlebell goblet or kettlebell front squat can cause unnecessary.

As Joe beautifully demonstrates in the video that goes along with this post, you will see that as he descends into the squat it’s like he is standing by a clock and aiming his butt toward 5PM. This is a clue that even the person with zero fitness background can visualize. You can use this cue to help people be aware of a target for which to aim in the descent of their squat.

to hinge back into almost a deadlift pattern and not a squat and with the front loading of a kettlebell goblet or kettlebell front squat can cause unnecessary.

As Joe beautifully demonstrates in the video that goes along with this post, you will see that as he descends into the squat it’s like he is standing by a clock and aiming his butt toward 5PM. This is a clue that even the person with zero fitness background can visualize. You can use this cue to help people be aware of a target for which to aim in the descent of their squat.

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